Offering Quality Personalized Healthcare Right Here @ Home

Offering Quality Personalized Healthcare Right Here @ Home

Welcome to VMH! Immunizations
Immunizations

Immunizations are given every Wednesday at VMH Community and Home Care. The 1st and 3rd Wednesdays hours are 1pm - 6pm. All other Wednesdays are 1pm - 4pm. No appointment is needed during clinic hours. NO DOCTORS ORDERS NEEDED.  Must be accompanied by a Parent. Medcaid Accepted.  There is a $10 administration fee unless covered by Title-19.



Adults are Primary Spreaders of Pertussis Disease

According to testing performed by the State Hygienic Laboratory, the Iowa Department of Public Health (IDPH) says children ages 5 to 14 years make up the bulk of reported pertussis cases, but it’s important to note that adults are considered the primary ‘spreaders’ of the disease.

“Children receive pertussis vaccine series beginning at 2 months of age, and are recommended to get a booster dose of pertussis vaccine at 11 or 12 years of age,” said IDPH Medical Director, Dr. Patricia Quinlisk. “Most adults haven’t had a pertussis vaccination since childhood so they probably have no immunity left to pertussis. When they get the disease, their symptoms are milder and are often mistaken for a lingering cough, but they still spread the disease to others.”

The most common symptoms of pertussis in children are fits of coughing, sometimes followed by vomiting or a ‘whooping’ sound as air is inhaled. Adults also cough, but usually the cough is not as severe, and the “whoop” is not heard. This is why many adults do not realize they have pertussis.

It’s especially important that adults who are around children receive pertussis-containing vaccine because they can spread the disease to infants and young children who are too young to be fully immunized.  This is called cocooning - providing a cocoon of safety around the child who cannot be vaccinated or is not old enough to be fully vaccinated.

In infants, pertussis can be severe and even deadly. Adults can receive the Tdap shot (the adult “tetanus booster” that also contains pertussis vaccine). Getting vaccinated with Tdap at least two weeks before coming into close contact with an infant is especially important for families and caregivers of new infants. Adults 65 years and older who have close contact with infants should also get a dose of Tdap if they never have before.

While taking antibiotics will treat the infection and prevent an individual from spreading the disease any further, the cough may continue for weeks while the irritated airways completely heal. If you are diagnosed with pertussis, it is especially important to stay home for 5 days while taking the antibiotic prescribed by your physician and to limit contact with others to prevent the spread of this disease.

The Tdap vaccine is available every Wednesday afternoon at the weekly Veterans Memorial Hospital Community and Home Care immunization clinic, located on the upper level of Veterans Memorial Hospital.  For more information and to answer any questions, please call Veterans Memorial Hospital Community and Home Care, formerly Allamakee County Public Health, at 563-568-5660.

 
Protect Infants with a “Cocoon” of Vaccinated Caregivers - Adult vaccinations are important to protect newborns

Infants are the group at highest risk of being hospitalized and dying from influenza and whooping cough, yet they are too young to be fully immunized against these serious diseases. As families prepare for a new child by readying a crib and installing a baby car seat, they should also make sure everyone who will be caring for that child is fully vaccinated against both the flu and whooping cough. Those needing to be immunized include mom and dad, siblings, and other caregivers like grandparents and baby sitters.

“About 75 percent of the time in Iowa, infants with whooping cough got the disease from a family member with the disease,” said IDPH Medical Director, Dr. Patricia Quinlisk. “Anyone who will be in frequent contact with the baby, including mom and dad, siblings, and other caregivers like grandparents and babysitters need to be vaccinated. ‘Cocooning’ the baby with healthy people will prevent the baby from being exposed to the flu and whooping cough.”

Both health care providers and new parents should make protecting their baby from vaccine-preventable diseases a priority. During prenatal visits, as well as after delivery, health care providers should check to ensure that all family members and potential care givers are vaccinated. New parents should insist that all those caring for their baby – parents, grandparents, siblings, baby sitters, day care providers – are all fully immunized before they are allowed to care for the child.  

With winter here, now is the perfect time to check the immunization status for all those who are already or will be around babies this winter. Adults need to receive a Tdap (the adult tetanus booster that contains pertussis –whooping cough) and a seasonal influenza vaccination. When family members and care givers get vaccinated, they are not only protecting their own health; they are also providing important protection for the very vulnerable baby.

These immunizations, plus the season flu and pneumonia vaccinations, are available at the Veterans Memorial Hospital Community and Home Care office each Wednesday afternoon.  The immunization clinics are offered the first and third Wednesdays of each month from 1:00 to 6:00 p.m., and all other Wednesdays from 1:00 to 4:00 p.m.   Community and Home Care is located on the upper level of Veterans Memorial Hospital. For more information, please call Veterans Memorial Hospital Community and Home Care at 568-5660.

 
Immunizations Don’t End With Infancy

Parents may not realize vaccines given to their child as a baby were a great start, but adolescents need protection against disease as well. Some vaccines received as a baby may need boosters to continue to provide protection and new vaccines may have been developed since the first shots were given. Immunizations have the potential to protect not only the health of adolescents, but their friends, families, and communities.

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Flu Shots Available Each Wednesday at VMH Community and Home Care

Veterans Memorial Hospital Community and Home Care will be offering flu shots every Wednesday afternoon during their regular immunization clinics.  The Community and Home Care Immunization Clinic is located on the upper level of Veterans Memorial Hospital.  

Immunization clinics are held from 1:00 to 6:00 p.m. the first and third Wednesdays of the month, and from 1:00 to 4:00 p.m. all other Wednesdays.  The flu vaccine will be available each Wednesday during the normal immunization clinic hours. 

Flu vaccine, pneumonia vaccine, and a combination of flu and pneumonia vaccine will all be available.  Tetanus shots will be offered as well. 

Billing for Medicare will be completed by the Community and Home Care staff, but participants will need to bring their physician’s name and their Medicare number with them.

                The Center for Disease Control now recommends that everyone age 6 months of age and older get vaccinated against the flu every year.  Flu shots are highly recommended for the following people:

  • Anyone age 50 and over.
  • Residents of long term care facilities with chronic medical conditions.  
  • Any child or adult, including pregnant women, who has a serious long-term health problem with heart disease, anemia, asthma, lung disease, kidney disease or diabetes, and in the past year had to see a doctor regularly or be admitted to a hospital.  
  • Women who will be more than 3 months pregnant during influenza season. 
  • People 6 months to 18 years of age on long-term aspirin treatment (these people could develop Reye Syndrome if they catch influenza)
  • People who are less able to fight infections because of a disease he/she was born with or contracted (like HIV), are receiving treatments with drugs such as steroids or are having cancer treatments with x-rays or drugs. 
  • Anyone having close contact with people who are at high risk for contracting a serious case of influenza including health care workers and people living with high risk persons. Influenza vaccines are also recommended for people in schools and colleges, people who provide important community services, people going to the tropics any time of the year and just anyone who wants to reduce their chance of catching influenza.

Please check with your local family practice physician if you have any questions about your eligibility for the influenza vaccination.  For more information, please call the Veterans Memorial Hospital Community and Home Care Department at (563) 568-5660. Veterans Memorial Hospital Community and Home Care is located on the upper level of Veterans Memorial Hospital.

Influenza Vaccine

Influenza, also called the flu, can cause fever, chills, headache, cough, sore throat, and muscle aches to people of any age, and can lead to pneumonia and even death. But most deaths caused by influenza are in elderly people.

The Center for Disease Control now recommends that everyone age 6 months of age and older get vaccinated against the flu every year.  Flu shots are highly recommended for the following people:

  • Anyone age 50 and over.
  • Residents of long term care facilities with chronic medical conditions.
  • Any child or adult, including pregnant women, who has a serious long-term health problem with heart disease, anemia, asthma, lung disease, kidney disease or diabetes, and in the past year had to see a doctor regularly or be admitted to a hospital.
  • Women who will be more than 3 months pregnant during influenza season.
  • People 6 months to 18 years of age on long-term aspirin treatment (these people could develop Reye Syndrome if they catch influenza)
  • People who are less able to fight infections because of a disease he/she was born with or contracted (like HIV), are receiving treatments with drugs such as steroids or are having cancer treatments with x-rays or drugs.
  • Anyone having close contact with people who are at high risk for contracting a serious case of influenza including health care workers and people living with high risk persons.
  • Influenza vaccines are also recommended for people in schools and colleges, people who provide important community services, people going to the tropics any time of the year and just anyone who wants to reduce their chance of catching influenza.

An annual flu shot is also encouraged for:

  • Healthy children 6-23 months of age.
  • Household contacts and out-of-home caretakers of infants from 0-23 months of age, especially those younger than 6 months.
  • People who provide essential community services.
  • People at high risk for flu complications who travel to the Southern hemisphere between April and September, or who travel to the tropics or in organized tourist groups at any time.
  • People living in dormitories or under other crowded conditions, to prevent outbreaks.
  • Anyone else who wants to reduce their chance of catching influenza.

Since the influenza viruses change frequently, they may not always be covered by the vaccine and the vaccine does not protect against other viral infections other than influenza.

Anyone receiving the influenza vaccination should be sure to tell their doctor or nurse if they have or have had any of the following symptoms:

  • A serious allergy to eggs.
  • A serious allergic reaction or other problem after getting the influenza vaccination.
  • Were ever paralyzed by Guillain-Barre Syndrome.
  • Now have a moderate or severe illness.

Please check with your local family practice physician if you have any questions about your eligibility for the influenza vaccination.

For more information, please call the Veterans Memorial Hospital Community and Home Care Department at (563) 568-5660.

 
Immunization Dates/Times

Veterans Memorial Hospital Community and Home Care

Immunization Hours

 

Waukon 1st and 3rd Wednesday of each Month, 1:00-6:00 p.m.

All other Wednesday’s, 1:00-4:00 p.m.

At Veterans Memorial Hospital, Upper Level (3rd Floor)

No appointment needed during clinic hours

WIC Clinics Located in either Luana or Waukon

Call for an appointment 563-245-1145

NO Doctors Orders Needed

Must be accompanied by or have Parental consent for shots ***Medicaid Accepted

2011StaffImmunizations

 
Most Common Immunization Schedule

 

Age

Shot

2 months

Pediarix, HIB, Prevnar, Rotavirus

4 months

Pediarix, HIB, Prevnar, Rotavirus

6 months Pediarix, HIB, Prevnar, Rotavirus
12 months MMRV, Hep A, DTap, HIB, Prevnar
18 months MMRV, Hep A
4-6 years DTap, IPV
11-18 years TDap, HPV, Menactra, Hep B, Flu

 

 
Infant Immunizations

Just because a baby is healthy now does not mean he or she won’t get a childhood disease. Immunizations can protect against diseases such as measles, mumps, polio, tetanus, rotavirus, Hepatitis A and B, meningitis, HPV and chickenpox.

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Who should get the TDaP immunization and what is it?

TDaP is the Tetanus vaccine now combined with the Pertussis vaccine.  Pertussis is known as whooping cough and there has never been an adult dose of Pertussis available before now.  Pertussis can be carried by an adult to someone susceptible like a child. 

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